Lesson Plan Block 7

 

Block 7 (One to two lesson plans)
Learning Targets: Students will be able to:

·      Respond to poetry, citing evidence from the poem that supports conclusions drawn from details.

·      Use concrete visual or textual evidence to support multiple interpretive claims about a painting and about poems.

·      Put texts into conversation with each other and generate new insights through the comparative analysis.

·      Analyze a poem and for both denotative and connotative meanings. Analyze the impact of the author’s textual choices in creating an overall effect.

·      Analyze a critical essay, identifying its central argument and connecting it to poetry.

Common Core Standards Alignment: CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.1

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.2

Determine two or more themes or central ideas of a text and analyze their development over the course of the text, including how they interact and build on one another to produce a complex account; provide an objective summary of the text.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the text, including figurative and connotative meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including words with multiple meanings or language that is particularly fresh, engaging, or beautiful. (Include Shakespeare as well as other authors.)

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RL.11-12.5

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure specific parts of a text (e.g., the choice of where to begin or end a story, the choice to provide a comedic or tragic resolution) contribute to its overall structure and meaning as well as its aesthetic impact.

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.11-12.1

Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Hook:

 

 

Writing prompt.

·      Before class, have three copies each of Cynthia Hogue’s poems “Green surrounds the mind of summer,” “In a Mute Season” and “Radical Optimism” posted around the room.

·      Have students get out their journals.

·      Invite students to walk around the room and find a single word or short phrase that jumps out at them from one of the poems and use that word or phrase as a springboard for their writing prompt.

·      Have students share what they wrote with a classmate.

Scaffolded learning activities: ESSAY AND POETRY ANALYSIS

Read Cynthia Hogue’s essay “The Creature Within: On Poetry and Dis/ability.” Have three copies of each poem “Green surrounds the mind of summer,” “In a Mute Season” and “Radical Optimism” posted around the room in a gallery walk. Have students walk around the room and journal their reactions to each poem, noting how reactions change each time they re-read a poem.

·      Pass out copies of Cynthia Hogue’s essay “The Creature Within: On Poetry and Dis/ability.”

·      Read the essay silently, aloud to your students, using the “popcorn method” (assuming that all students feel comfortable reading aloud in front of the whole class), or read it aloud in small groups.

·      Discuss* Hogue’s primary argument about illness and how she supports it.

·      Have students walk around the room with their journals and pens in hand and read each poem (because there are 3 copies of each poem, that means they’ll read each poem three times). Have them note particularly how their perceptions of the structure and images of the poems change with multiple readings. For example, they might initially find the box quotes strange, but in the third reading they might start to understand Hogue’s purpose in including them and how they interact with the poem’s primary text.

·      Have them get in groups and work to apply TPCASTT to one of the poems. (By now, students should be familiar with this approach to interpreting poetry, but review as/if needed. See Lesson plan 1 if you would like to review the elements of TPCASTT.)

·      Toward the end of the activity, encourage students to come to a conclusion about the meaning of the poem as a whole.

·      In a large-group discussion, call on three groups—one for each poem—to share their findings with the whole class.

·      NOTE: if you are doing the whole unit and depending on how many class periods you are spending on each block, this might be a good time to distribute the literary analysis assignment sheets and to introduce the paper that will be the summative assessment for this unit.

Independent application: Read Me, chapters 16-18
Materials: Journals for students. Copies of Cynthia Hogue’s essay and 3 copies each of her poems.
Accessibility: ·      Students with impaired mobility will experience difficulty with the “gallery walk” activity that is part of today’s poetry lesson. (On the other hand, a mobile activity will be especially appealing for students with ADHD.) Think through how best to accommodate students with mobility impairments. Should you create a mini-gallery for them within easy reach of their desks? Can you rearrange the classroom furniture so that they can easily move from one poem to the next with their classmates? If they absolutely need to stay seated, make a “seated gallery” option available to all students so that they the mobility-impaired students will not experience the poetry readings alone. That way, most of the students will walk around the room, but a few will stay seated in a cluster. This is meant to be a social, interactive activity in which students quietly discuss with each other the features of the various poems as they are journaling their reactions.

 

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